top of page
  • Writer's pictureJacob Curtis

The 8 Key Financial Metrics Every Ecommerce Store Owner Should Know

Updated: May 30

In the world of e-commerce, where every click and conversion counts, understanding your financial metrics is like having a compass in the vast ocean. As an accountant specializing in e-commerce businesses, I've witnessed firsthand the transformative power of insightful financial analysis. Today, I'll navigate you through the essential financial metrics every e-commerce store owner should know, empowering you to steer your business toward success.



1. Revenue

Revenue is the total income generated from sales, less returns, discounts, and allowances. While it provides a snapshot of your sales performance, it's essential to dive deeper into revenue streams, such as product categories, customer segments, and sales channels, to identify areas of opportunity and optimization.


Calculating revenue for an e-commerce business involves summing up all the income generated from sales within a specific period and then subtracting returns, discounts, and allowances. Continuing with the previous example:


Over the course of a month, you ran a sale of $10 off and you sold:


- 100 pairs of sneakers at $50 each (normally $60 each)

- 50 pairs of boots at $80 each (normally $90 each)

- 75 pairs of sandals at $30 each (normally $40)


To calculate the revenue for the month, you would perform the following calculation:


Revenue = (Quantity of Sneakers sold × Actual price per Sneaker) + (Quantity of Boots sold × Actual price per Boot) + (Quantity of Sandals sold × Actual price per Sandal)


Revenue = (100 × $50) + (50 × $80) + (75 × $30)

Revenue = ($5,000) + ($4,000) + ($2,250)

Revenue = $11,250


So, the total revenue for your store for the month would be $11,250. This figure represents the total income generated from sales after accounting for returns and discounts. It provides a snapshot of your store's top-line performance for the specified period.


2. Average Order Value (AOV)

AOV measures the average amount spent by customers in a single transaction. Increasing AOV is a strategic lever for driving revenue growth without necessarily acquiring more customers. Tactics like upselling, cross-selling, and bundling can help boost AOV and enhance your store's profitability.


To calculate the Average Order Value (AOV), you would need to find out the total revenue generated and divide it by the total number of orders.


Using the same example of the e-commerce store selling shoes. Let's assume the same data from before, where you sold:


- 100 pairs of sneakers at $50 each

- 50 pairs of boots at $80 each

- 75 pairs of sandals at $30 each


First, calculate the total revenue. You know that there was $11,250 in revenue.


Now, let's calculate the total number of orders:


Total Orders = Quantity of Sneakers sold + Quantity of Boots sold + Quantity of Sandals sold


Total Orders = 100 + 50 + 75

Total Orders = 225


Finally, calculate the Average Order Value (AOV):


AOV = Total Revenue / Total Orders

AOV = $11,250 / 225

AOV = $50


So, the Average Order Value (AOV) for your e-commerce store selling shoes would be $50. This means that, on average, each order placed is worth $50. Understanding your AOV can help you make informed decisions regarding pricing strategies, promotions, and upselling techniques to increase the value of each transaction.


3. Customer Acquisition Cost (CAC)

CAC quantifies the resources expended to acquire a new customer. It encompasses marketing expenses, sales commissions, and other associated costs. Balancing CAC with customer lifetime value (LTV) is crucial for sustainable growth. Aim to optimize your marketing channels and improve customer retention to achieve a favorable CAC-to-LTV ratio.


Let's calculate the Customer Acquisition Cost (CAC) for the e-commerce store selling shoes.


Assuming you spent $2,000 on marketing efforts in a given month to acquire new customers, and during that month, you acquired 150 new customers. CAC can be calculated using the following formula:


CAC = Total Marketing Expenses \ Number of New Customers


Now, let's plug in the values:


CAC = $2,000 \ 150

CAC = $13.33


So, the Customer Acquisition Cost (CAC) for your e-commerce store selling shoes would be approximately $13.33 per new customer. This means that, on average, you're spending $13.33 to acquire each new customer through your marketing efforts during that particular month. Understanding your CAC helps in assessing the efficiency and effectiveness of your marketing strategies and allows you to allocate your marketing budget more effectively to acquire customers at a reasonable cost.


4. Conversion Rate

Conversion rate measures the percentage of website visitors who complete a desired action, such as making a purchase. A high conversion rate indicates the effectiveness of your website design, user experience, and marketing strategies. Continuously test and optimize your conversion funnel to maximize conversion rates and drive revenue.


Let's calculate the Conversion Rate for the e-commerce store selling shoes.


Assuming that during a specific month, your e-commerce store had 10,000 website visitors, out of which 500 made a purchase.


Conversion Rate can be calculated using the following formula:


Conversion Rate = (Number of Conversions \ Number of Website Visitors) x 100


Given:

Number of Conversions = 500

Number of Website Visitors = 10,000


Now, let's plug in the values:


Conversion Rate = (500 \ 10,000) x 100

Conversion Rate = (0.05) x 100

Conversion Rate = 5%


So, the Conversion Rate for your e-commerce store selling shoes would be 5%. This means that 5% of your website visitors made a purchase during that particular month. Understanding your conversion rate helps assess the effectiveness of your website's design, user experience, and marketing efforts in converting visitors into customers. Increasing the Conversion Rate can lead to higher sales and improved profitability for your e-commerce business.


5. Inventory Turnover Ratio

For e-commerce store owners managing physical products, the inventory turnover ratio is a key metric for inventory management efficiency. It calculates how quickly inventory is sold and replenished within a specific period. Striking the right balance between inventory levels and sales velocity is essential to minimize carrying costs and avoid stockouts.


Let's calculate the Inventory Turnover Ratio using the provided information.


Given:

- Number of Sneakers Sold = 100

- Number of Boots Sold = 50

- Number of Sandals Sold = 75

- Cost per Pair of Sneakers = $30

- Cost per Pair of Boots = $50

- Cost per Pair of Sandals = $10

- Beginning Inventory = $2,000

- Ending Inventory = $3,000


First, let's calculate the Cost of Goods Sold (COGS) for each type of shoe:


COGS_Sneakers = Number of Sneakers Sold × Cost per Pair of Sneakers

COGS_Sneakers = 100 pairs × $30

COGS_Sneakers = $3,000


COGS_Boots = Number of Boots Sold × Cost per Pair of Boots

COGS_Boots = 50 pairs × $50

COGS_Boots = $2,500


COGS_Sandals = Number of Sandals Sold × Cost per Pair of Sandals

COGS_Sandals = 75 pairs × $10

COGS_Sandals = $750


Now, let's calculate the Total Cost of Goods Sold (COGS):


Total COGS = COGS_Sneakers + COGS_Boots + COGS_Sandals

Total COGS = $3,000 + $2,500 + $750

Total COGS = $6,250


Next, let's calculate the Average Inventory:


Average Inventory = (Beginning Inventory + Ending Inventory) / 2

Average Inventory = ($2,000 + $3,000) / 2

Average Inventory = $2,500


Now, let's plug in the values to calculate the Inventory Turnover Ratio:


Inventory Turnover Ratio = Total COGS / Average Inventory

Inventory Turnover Ratio = $6,250 / $2,500

Inventory Turnover Ratio = 2.5


So, the Inventory Turnover Ratio for your e-commerce store selling shoes would be 2.5. This means that, on average, your entire inventory was sold and replaced approximately 2.5 times during that particular period. Tracking this number over multiple time periods and by product type can help you strike the right balance between inventory levels and sales velocity, which is essential to minimize carrying costs and avoid stockouts.


6. Gross Profit Margin

Gross Profit margin reflects the percentage of revenue that translates into profit after deducting the cost of goods sold. While focusing on sales and revenue growth is essential, prioritizing profitability ensures the long-term sustainability of your e-commerce business. Analyze your cost structure and pricing strategies to improve gross profit margins over time.


Let's calculate the Gross Profit using the example we have been going through.


We know that the total revenue is $11,250, and the total Cost of Goods Sold is $6,250.


Gross Profit = Total Revenue - Total COGS

Gross Profit = $11,250 - $6,250

Gross Profit = $5,000


Finally, let's calculate the Gross Profit Margin:


Gross Profit Margin = (Gross Profit / Total Revenue) × 100

Gross Profit Margin = ($5,000 / $11,250) × 100

Gross Profit Margin = 0.4444 × 100

Gross Profit Margin = 44.44%


So, the Gross Profit Margin for your e-commerce store selling shoes would be approximately 44.44%. This indicates that for every dollar of revenue generated from shoe sales, your store retains about 44 cents as gross profit after accounting for the cost of goods sold. This tells you how much you have to cover your other expenses. Analyze your cost structure and pricing strategies to improve gross profit margins over time.


7. Net Income

Net Income, or the bottom line, is the profit after deducting all other expenses. While focusing on top-line growth is essential, examining your other expenses ensures the long-term sustainability of your e-commerce business. Analyze your cost structure and operational efficiency to improve net income over time.


To calculate the Net Income for the e-commerce store selling shoes, we'll need to deduct all operating expenses from the Gross Profit. Operating expenses typically include items such as wages, rent, utilities, marketing expenses, taxes, and other costs associated with running the business.


Given:

- Gross Profit = $5,000


Operating Expenses:

- Salaries = $1,000

- Rent = $500

- Utilities = $200

- Marketing Expenses = $2,000

- Taxes = $300

- Other Costs = $200


Now, let's calculate the total operating expenses:


Total Operating Expenses = Salaries + Rent + Utilities + Marketing Expenses + Taxes + Other Costs

Total Operating Expenses = $1,000 + $500 + $200 + $2,000 + $300 + $200

Total Operating Expenses = $4,200


Now, let's calculate the Net Income:


Net Income = Gross Profit - Total Operating Expenses

Net Income = $5,000 - $4,200

Net Income = $800


So, the Net Income for your e-commerce store selling shoes, after deducting all specific operating expenses, would be $800. This represents the profit left over after accounting for wages, rent, utilities, marketing expenses, taxes, and other costs.


Net income, also known as net profit or the bottom line, represents the residual profit after deducting all expenses from total revenue. In simpler terms, it's the amount of money a company has left over after covering all its costs, including operating expenses, taxes, interest, and depreciation.


Net income is crucial in any business, including e-commerce, for several reasons:


  1. Financial Performance Evaluation: Net income provides a clear indicator of a company's financial performance over a specific period. It reflects how efficiently the business operates and its ability to generate profits from its operations.


  1. Business Decision Making: Net income influences strategic decision-making within the company. It helps management determine the allocation of resources, such as reinvesting profits into the business for expansion, paying dividends to owners, or reducing debt.


  1. Benchmarking and Comparison: Net income allows businesses to benchmark their performance against industry peers and competitors. It provides insights into how well the company is performing relative to others in the same sector and helps identify areas for improvement.


  1. Tax Obligations: Net income is crucial in determining the company's or owner’s tax liabilities. It serves as the basis for calculating income taxes and accurately tracking net income, which is essential for compliance with tax regulations.


In the context of e-commerce businesses, net income holds particular significance due to the unique dynamics of online retail. E-commerce companies often face intense competition, fluctuating market trends, and evolving consumer preferences. Achieving and maintaining a healthy net income is essential for sustaining operations, funding growth initiatives, and remaining competitive in the digital marketplace.


Additionally, e-commerce businesses typically have specific operating expenses related to website maintenance, digital marketing, fulfillment, and customer service, making accurate calculation and management of net income crucial for financial sustainability and success.


8. Return on Investment (ROI)

ROI measures the return generated from investments relative to the cost of those investments. Whether it's marketing campaigns, technology upgrades, or expansion initiatives, assessing ROI enables you to allocate resources effectively and prioritize investments that yield the highest returns.


To calculate the Return on Investment (ROI) of marketing expenses, we'll use the following formula:


ROI = (Net Income \ Total Marketing Expenses) x 100


Given:

- Net Income = $800

- Total Marketing Expenses = $2,000


Let's calculate the ROI of marketing expenses:


ROI = ($800 \ $2,000) x 100

ROI = (0.4) x 100%

ROI = 40%


So, the Return on Investment (ROI) of marketing expenses for the e-commerce store selling shoes is 40%. This means that the company earned $0.40 in net profit for every dollar spent on marketing.


A positive ROI indicates that the marketing efforts were profitable, generating more revenue than the expenses incurred. It's a key metric for evaluating the effectiveness and efficiency of marketing campaigns and other initiatives in driving business growth and profitability.


In conclusion, mastering e-commerce financial metrics empowers store owners to make informed decisions, drive growth, and confidently navigate online retail's complexities. By leveraging these metrics as guiding principles, you'll not only optimize performance but also cultivate a resilient and thriving e-commerce business.


If you have any questions or need assistance with managing your company's finances, don't hesitate to reach out to us. We're here to help you piece together financial freedom.


Schedule a call with me to get you started by going to https://www.jacobcurtiscpa.com/5-strategies-calendar





1 view0 comments

Comments


bottom of page